Does Any One Know About the Farm House Burned Down on King Road in Michigan? the Family Was Ketchum

Try the local library newspaper morgue - it will be in micro-fiche

1. would you take the leap to owning your own farm/house at 20?

There are things to consider. Can you rent a place for only the summer, or do you need to sign a 6 month or one year lease? Who will you get hay from? How will you store it? Is there water and electric in the barn? Will you need to buy everything from a water trough to rubber stall mats? What is the condition of the pastures and fencing? What equipment do you need to maintain the property? Can you afford to buy all of the needed equipment to deal with manure, field maintenance, lawns, plowing (if you have snow there)? Is there a generator for when the power fails? Country water pumps run on electric power. When the power fails, you have no water for you or the horses, or even to flush your toilets !!! I think it would be great if you could make this work, but be sure you have considered all of the factors before entering into it. And who you find to share this with you can make all the difference in how well it might go. I would not count on anyone else financially in deciding whether or not to go ahead. If you can afford to do it on your own, and taking on boarders will just serve to help to reduce your costs, then it might work. Anything you do should be put into writing in a legally binding contract.

2. I need a simple nice farm house name?

The Farmers Cottage

3. My friend found a rock while doing some excavating around his old farm house(over 100 yrs old)?

There's not many platinum mines in Ohio, so I would probably rule that out. You can do a couple of things: First - put a magnet on it. Does it stick? Then you've got a lump of steel or iron of some sort. The scrap price of steel is pretty high, but unless you've got a huge piece, it's probably not worth a whole lot. Or... Wwash off all dirt, etc. Then compute the specific gravity - to do that, you weigh it on a metric scale, and record the weight. Next, place it in a graduated cylinder partially filled with water. Subtract the starting water level from the ending water level to get the volume of the rock. Divide the volume by the weight to get the SG. Compare this to different kinds of rock, metal, etc, to get an idea of what it is. This is just basic physical science. Or.... go to your local high school, community college, state college, etc, and ask to talk to a teacher or professor that teaches geology, and have it evaluated. They will probably be able to identify it fairly quickly.

4. is it possible if yes then HOW ? to produce more than 1KW 220 V 50 Hz solar energy for little farm house use?

Do not listen to any information from us that gives you hardware information. Go to the Internet, look at solar power, and spend some time studying. Also look in the search box near the top of this page.

5. i moved into a farm house and the people that used to live here left their horses with no food or water. help?

NO GRAIN! Whatever you do, do not feed them grain - you could kill them. Give them water and ring a vet right away. Fiber is what horses need to make their gut work but you need expert advice about this. My instinct would be to feed well soaked beet shreds, as this is high in fiber and wet, which would prevent colic. Either that or soaked hay, the last thing you need is to cause an impaction in the gut (a blockage). I really would advise you to seek expert advice right this minute.

6. Ideas for a film in a old farm house?

Here's my idea, the biggest problem is the ages of the characters (but since there are only three characters you might be able to work around this) Rich, Wall St. type white male is driving down a deserted country road after visiting his dying mother. His business is being investigated, he's facing criminal charges, and he's on the phone trying to straighten things out while racing back to civilization as fast as his sports car will go. Of course, cell phones and driving do not mix, he loses control and totals the car and his phone. Dragging himself inside, he collapses on the floor. Later that night, as the rain has picked up to near tornado force, a wet, obviously homeless African American stumbles into the farmhouse. The two start conversing; however, the Wall St. guy is obviously terrified. The black homeless guy is perceptive enough to notice this and, in a manner reminiscent of the whisky priest's encounter with the mestizo in Graham Greene's _The Power and the Glory_, he calls the richer man out on his discomfort. At the same time, the homeless guy begins to recognize the white guy; the corporate embezzlement case has been big news for a while, and the white guy has had his picture in the paper. Vaguely aware of the hypocrisy of a white collar thief's prejudice and fear of a potential thief, the white guy gets more and more upset; afraid that the black guy will connect his face to the embezzlement story. As this is going on, it gets later and later and it becomes apparent that the white guy does not plan on going to sleep before the black guy. The black guy, in his menacingly open style, points this out. Left with little choice, the white guy goes to sleep. Much later that night, he is woken up. Panicked, he pretends to be asleep and looks around. Between flashes of lightning, he notices the black guy approaching him slowly. Fearing imminent death, he catches a glimpse of salvation lying at his side in the form of a rusty crowbar. When the black guy enters striking distance, the white guy attacks him with the crowbar and smashes his head in. He tries to sleep, but the presence of the body distracts him. while trying to remove the body, a notepad and cellphone fall out of the pockets. Using the light from a flashlight he found in his car trunk, he reads the notes, and discovers that the black man was in fact a journalist/author investigating life as a homeless man in rural America. Next, he checks the phone and discovers that the last call made was 911. It is now almost dawn and, hobbling outside, he is confronted by a sheriff. Last line is "we got your call last night... would have come out here sooner but the storm washed out half the road..." (c) Henry T. 8-23-2008

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Introduction to Farm House | Stephen Northup Family of Farm House
Stephen Northup family of farm houseIn 1645 Stephen Northup emigrated from Great Britain to New England. He became the Town Sergeant of Providence in 1660, and took an Oath of Allegiance on 19 May 1671 in Kingstowne. Stephen Northup Jr. was born 1660, the first son of Stephen Northup Sr. Stephen Northup Sr. lived at North Kingston but conflicting records have him living in Providence at the same time.He was granted a plot of land (25 acres) on October 2, 1655 by the "Towne Meeting of Providence, R.I." At another "Towne Meeting" on Aug 27, 1656, he was granted commonage equal to any other townsman, the right to vote, the right of being a "freeman" and proprietor in the town of Providence. On February 8, 1662 Northup Sr. sold a plot of land (possibly that same 25 acres) in the Providence region and moved to Kingstowne.What is known is the Northup family started with the seniors marriage to Sarah Elizabeth Harrington in about 1654, and gave birth to their first child (Stephen Jr.) in 1660 with records indicating birth in the town of Kingstowne (North Kingstown) and Providence. Stephen Sr. officially moved to Kingstowne in 1662 but clearly had an established residence in place since his second son, Benjamin, was born that same year in the town of North Kingstown (according to town records). The likely scenario of events to help to accurately date this home is to project that Stephen Sr. acquired the North Kingstown property at, or around, the year of 1660 with the intention of moving his new family there. However, his official record of North Kingstown residency is not until 1662. With these facts at hand, one can surmise that during this two-year period, Northup prepared his North Kingstown property for construction of his home completing it early 1662. This places the actual beginning construction of the Stephen Northup House within the time period of 1660, or 1661.------Preston House of farm housePreston House may refer to:Preston School of Industry, Ione, California, also known as Preston Castle and listed as the latter on the NRHP in Amador County, CaliforniaPreston Farm (Fort Collins, Colorado), listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Larimer County, ColoradoPreston Bungalow, Paris, Idaho, listed on the NRHP in Bear Lake County, IdahoMaj. Walter Preston House, Becknerville, Kentucky, listed on the NRHP in Clark County, KentuckyPreston House (Milton, Kentucky) on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Trimble County, KentuckyPreston-on-the-Patuxent, Johnstown, Maryland, listed on the NRHP in Calvert County, MarylandWhite-Preston House, Danvers, Massachusetts, listed on the NRHP in Essex County, MassachusettsPreston House (Thompson Falls, Montana) on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Sanders County, MontanaStillwell-Preston House, Saddle River, New Jersey, listed on the NRHP in Bergen County, New JerseyCharles Preston House, Seaside, Oregon, listed on the NRHP in Clatsop County, OregonHampton-Preston House, Columbia, South Carolina, listed on the NRHP in Richland County, South CarolinaPreston Farm (Kingsport, Tennessee), listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Sullivan County, TennesseeThaddeus and Josepha Preston House, Paris, Texas, listed on the NRHP in Lamar County, TexasPreston-Lafreniere Farm, Bolton, Vermont, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Chittenden County, VermontPreston House (Marion, Virginia) on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Smyth County, VirginiaPreston House (Salem, Virginia) on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Salem, VirginiaPreston House (Saltville, Virginia) on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Smyth County, VirginiaPreston Community Clubhouse, Preston, Washington, listed on the NRHP in King County, WashingtonPreston Hall (Waitsburg, Washington), listed on the NRHP in Walla Walla County, Washington------Ask, Vestland of farm houseAsk is a small village in the eastern part of Asky municipality in Vestland county, Norway. The village lies along the Byfjorden on the eastern shore of the island of Asky. The village of Ask is well known for the farming of strawberries which are sold in the marketplace in the nearby city of Bergen during the summer season.The 1.5-square-kilometre (370-acre) village has a population (2019) of 1,562 and a population density of 1,041 inhabitants per square kilometre (2,700/sqmi).Due to its pleasant climate and its location on an island near Bergen, Ask was the location of a kongsgrd (i.e., royal farm the Norwegian equivalent of a palace estate). Ask grd (literally Ask farm), with the farm number 1, was the basis for the name of Asky. This was also the site of the extremely old church and churchyard which was in use from around the year 1200 until 1741. Today the old church site is marked by a stone cross. A newer Ask Church was built in the centre of Ask in 1741. Ask village is the saga location for a famous dispute over inheritance between Egill Skallagrmsson and Berg-nundr. When Berg-nundr refused to allow Egill to claim his wife sgerr's share of her father's inheritance, Egill challenged nundr to a holmgang.The local dialect of the village also reflects the continuing close tie to Bergen, with the dialect being more similar to that of Bergen than that of the rest of Asky; the connection was reinforced into modern times as the wealthy merchants and other residents of Bergen summered there.Ask has had famous residents up to recent times. Fridtjof Nansen lived in a house near Kongshaugen in a short period. Amalie Skram lived at Lien at Ask, near Ask Dambruk, from 1876 to 1878, in the same house where the headmaster, Nils Peder land, lived for 40 years.------In pop culture of farm houseArizona Republic writer Jim Cook had a chapter on Weedville in his 2002 book, "Arizona Liars Journal", published by Cowboy Miner Productions; .mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground-image:url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground-image:url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground-image:url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground-image:url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right .1em center.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inheritISBN978-1931725033.------Taber State Forest of farm houseTaber State Forest covers over 1,200 acres (4.9km2) in Kent County and is located 10 miles (16km) southwest of Harrington. Parker Road south off of Delaware Route 14, and the Maryland state line generally form the western boundary. About 17 acres (69,000m2) actually extends westward into the state of Maryland. Burrsville Road running southeast from Parker Road cuts through near the center of the land holdings. Saulsbury Creek Road generally forms a boundary for the southwest extent of the property.Taber State Forest is a primitive use facility and there is no formal office onsite. It is primarily used for hunting, hiking, and wildlife habitat. In addition, the forest is also managed for timber production.History of Taber State ForestAlthough officially dedicated in 1994, the origin of Taber State Forest was 1984, when the Delaware Forest Service received the 350-acre (1.4km2) Saulsbury Farm. Also included at Taber State Forest is the building known as the Smith School House (now a residence on the property). The Cooper and Cooper Study (found in the holdings of the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs) describes the Smith School as a one-teacher schoolhouse with an average student population of 23. The school operated 180 days of the year.Saulsbury Farm Gravesite: The Saulsbury Tract is home of the Saulsbury family burial grave, which contains a memorial to Gove Saulsbury, the 41st governor of Delaware (18651871). This historic gravesite is approximately 50ft (15m). by 75ft (23m). with 16 graves. The site has one large group monument and three small grave stones with a two-rail split rail fence around the site. Deed restrictions state this parcel must remain as a burial site and be maintained as such.------Life and career of farm houseBorn in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Price attended common schools as a child and engaged in agricultural pursuits on his fathers farm for several years. He worked as a bookkeeper for a large commission house near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and equipped himself for mercantile life. He moved to Davenport, Iowa in 1844 where he engaged in the mercantile business, served as collector, treasurer, and recorder of Scott County, Iowa and was president of the State Bank of Iowa from 1859 to 1866. He was one of fifteen men to sign the Articles of Incorporation for the Oakdale Cemetery Company on May 14, 1856.At the outbreak of the Civil War, Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood appointed Price paymaster general of Iowa troops to whom he advanced large sums of money.In 1862, he was elected as a Republican to represent Iowa's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. He served three consecutive terms, from 1863 to 1869. During that period, he served as chairman of the Committee on Revolutionary Claims from 1863 to 1865 and of the Committee on Pacific Railroads from 1865 to 1869.After Price declined renomination in 1868, returned to Iowa, where he served as president of the First National Bank of Davenport in 1873 and president of the Davenport and St. Paul Railroad. He was also a trustee of the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home, being instrumental in gaining the donation of Camp Kinsman in Davenport for the Home.In 1876, voters in the Second District returned Price to the House of Representatives, where he served two additional terms (from 1877 to 1881). He declined renomination in 1880. He was appointed chief clerk of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1881 and later the same year was appointed Commissioner of Indian Affairs by President James A. Garfield, serving from 1881 to 1885.Price lived in Washington, D.C. until his death there on May 30, 1901. He was interred in Oakdale Cemetery in Davenport.
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