LAPD Announces Arrest, Recovery of Items Worth 'millions' in Series of Burglaries of Celebrity Homes

It sounds like something out of a Hollywood movie: A man posing as a high-end real estate buyer or broker tours open houses in posh neighborhoods, then returns later, blacking out surveillance cameras and taking millions of dollars worth of items.But Los Angeles Police detectives say it's not a movie; it's a real-life case they are now working on.Detectives announced the arrest of 32-year-old Benjamin Ackerman on Wednesday, although he had been arrested in September and released on $1 million bond, according to jail records.He's accused of burglarizing numerous celebrities' homes, with alleged victims including Usher, Jason Derulo, Adam Lambert and a member of the cast of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Ackerman has not yet been charged by the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office.Police executed a search warrant on Ackerman's storage unit and found a treasure trove of high-end stolen goods."The execution of the search warrant led not only to the arrest of Ackerman but also to the recovery of over 2,000 high-end items," LAPD Captain Cory Palka told ABC News. The items included stolen art, clothing, purses, and fine wine. Many of the products had brand names, like Rolex and Gucci.Police recovered so many items that they had to set up a website, where they hope the owners of the items will find them and contact detectives to claim them.Most of the items taken are worth thousands of dollars each. "We estimate the total worth in the millions of dollars," the lead investigator Detective Jared Timmons said.Thirteen victims have been identified so far, but detectives believe there are many more who are not yet known. The investigation is ongoing, they said."A lot of stuff still has to be verified," said Timmons. "We have diamond necklaces. We have to see what type of diamonds they are, whose they are and what the actual values are."Police are also working to appraise and inspect all the recovered artwork."The suspect is known to have changed the numbers on artwork," said Timmons. "So if you've purchased any artwork or any items in the Southern California region, please contact us because we have evidence he likes to change numbers and resell this artwork to others."According to the LAPD, Ackerman would pose as a high-end real estate buyer or agent and tour open houses. After touring an open house, he would come back later and burglarize the home.Police say his tactics were highly sophisticated. In some cases, he was somehow able to disable surveillance systems, making cameras go black for hours around the time he would allegedly carry out his crime. In other cases, they said, he would simply destroy cameras on the property so he could not be seen.Ultimately, however, it was the open houses that led police to focus on Ackerman. They noticed that he had signed in to houses that were later burglarized. From there they began following leads and watching Ackerman.Police said they believe Ackerman had accomplices because the crimes were so intricate, and said he has connections in New York. However, detectives have not yet identified anybody working with Ackerman.Attempts to reach Ackerman for comment were not successful, and it is unclear whether he had retained an attorney.Right now police don't believe Ackerman is connected to a larger celebrity burglary ring that was dismantled by the LAPD in November. In that case, the suspects had alleged gang ties. Numerous celebrities have been victims of burglaries around Southern California in recent years.

HOT PRODUCTS
pas de données
GET IN TOUCH WITH US
Articles recommandés
How DNA on Coffee Cup Led to Arrest in 1972 Rape, Murder of Woman: Officials
A 77-year-old Washington state man was arrested Wednesday decades after he allegedly killed a 20-year-old woman, and police say he was nabbed through the novel technique of genetic genealogy.On August 23, 1972, Jody Loomis was on her way to the stables to ride her horse when she was attacked and shot in the head, officials with the Snohomish County Sheriff's Office said at a news conference on Thursday. She was raped and her body was left mostly nude, officials said.DNA was recovered from semen at the scene and that DNA was later uploaded to the law enforcement database CODIS, but there was never a hit on the sample, investigators said.The case went cold until the new technique known as genetic genealogy led police to their suspect in 2018.Genetic genealogy takes the DNA of an unknown killer left behind at a crime scene and identifies a suspect by tracing the family tree through his or her family members, who voluntarily submit their DNA to public genealogy databases. The first public arrest through genetic genealogy was the April 2018 arrest of the suspected "Golden State Killer," and since then, genetic genealogy has helped identify more than 40 suspects in violent crimes.In 2018, DNA from a semen stain on a boot Loomis was wearing was compared to genetic databases. Genealogists then began to build a family tree, according to the probable cause affidavit.Genealogists concluded in August that the unknown DNA profile belonged to one of six brothers. Police zeroed in on one of them, Terrence Miller, who had prior sex offenses, the probable cause affidavit said.On Aug. 29, 2018, investigators followed Miller to a casino and recovered a coffee cup he threw into the trash; tests later confirmed the DNA on the coffee cup matched the DNA from the sperm on the victim's boot, the probable cause affidavit said.In November, two undercover detectives went to Millers' home in Edmonds, Washington, where Miller and his wife run a ceramic shop out of their garage, said the probable cause affidavit.After Miller's wife invited the detectives into the garage, they noticed a newspaper from May 2018 on the table, the document said. On the front page was an article on how genetic genealogy led to an arrest in a local double murder, and that crime also involved rape and gunshot wounds to the head, the document said."The presence of the newspaper seemed, at best, an odd coincidence," a prosecutor wrote in the probable cause affidavit. "A fair interference could also be drawn that [the] defendant was keeping track of the techniques law enforcement was using to solve cold cases."Miller is a lifelong resident of Snohomish County. Before the crime, he had been divorced twice and had three daughters, according to documents.At the time of the crime, Miller was 33 years old and living with his third wife, who has since died, according to documents. He also had two daughters with his third wife.His current wife is his fourth.Miller was arrested at his home on Wednesday and is accused of first-degree murder, according to court documents. He was interviewed on Wednesday but declined to give statements to police, authorities said.Miller did not know Loomis before the crime, according to authorities.He is due to make his first court appearance Thursday afternoon, officials said.
"We Want Dignity": 75,000 Protest Against Emmanuel Macron in France
Police and anti-government protesters clashed near the Champs-Elysees and in other parts of central Paris Saturday with demonstrators hurling rocks and paint at riot police who responded with tear gas.The clashes came as thousands took part in a third weekend of "yellow vest" protests which have morphed from anger over fuel taxes into a broader anti-government movement.Crowds of protesters gathering at the Arc de Triomphe earlier found the Champs-Elysees locked down with police manning barricades and water cannon.While several dozen were allowed through after an ID check and search, many others -- some wearing gas masks or ski goggles -- remained behind and fought with police who fired rounds of tear gas.Spreading from the Champs-Elysees, protesters led police on cat-and-mouse chases through other parts of the capital, setting light to cars and construction equipment.Authorities said 160 people had been arrested by the afternoon and 65 people injured, including eleven of the 5,000 police officers mobilised for the protests.An estimated 75,000 demonstrators were counted across the country as of 3:00 pm (1400 GMT), the interior ministry said, which for the most part remained calm.The number was well below the first day of protests on November 17, which attracted around 282,000 people, and also down from the 106,000 who turned out last Saturday.Dark plumes of smoke in several parts of Paris, however, were testament to the escalation in violence, to the consternation of many of the "yellow vests", so-called for the high-visibility jackets they wear."We're a peaceful movement, but we're disorganised -- it's a mess because we don't have a leader," said Dan Lodi, a 68-year-old pensioner on the Champs-Elysees."You always have some idiots who come to fight, but they don't represent us at all," he said.Stores and restaurants along the Champs-Elysees as well as surrounding streets had boarded up windows, anticipating a repeat of the clashes last Saturday which President Emmanuel Macron compared to "war scenes".Chantal, a 61-year-old pensioner who came from an eastern Paris suburb, said she was avoiding the "hooligans" but was determined to send Macron a message on the rising costs of living."He has to come down off his pedestal," she said under cold rain on the Champs-Elysees. "Every month I have to dip into my savings."Others voiced indignation at graffiti sprayed on the Arc de Triomphe, a monument to French war dead, including phrases like "Macron resign" and "the yellow vests triumph".Although police managed to clear the square around the Arc de Triomphe toward midday, sporadic clashes spilled into nearby neighbourhoods, and hundreds of protesters later returned to the square.But further down on the Champs-Elysees, several hundred people marched calmly behind a huge yellow-and-red banner reading "Macron, stop taking us for idiots!""With all these tax hikes, there's not much left for eating at the end of the month," said Philippe, a high school cook in the Essonne region outside Paris.The "yellow vest" movement erupted on social media in October and has since become a wider protest against Macron, who is accused of failing to recognise the rising cost of living that has left many struggling.The countrywide protests have included many pensioners and have been most active in small urban and rural areas where demonstrators blocked roads, closed motorway toll booths, and even walled up the entrance to tax offices.Two people have died and dozens have been injured in the protests, which opinion polls suggest still attract the support of two out of three French people.Attempts by the government to negotiate with the grassroots movement have failed, in large part because representatives have insisted on public talks broadcast on TV."We want our dignity back and we want to be able to live from our work, which is absolutely not the case today," Jason Herbert said after walking out of talks with Prime Minister Edouard Philippe on Friday.Macron has sought to douse the anger by promising three months of nationwide talks on how best to transform France into a low-carbon economy without penalising the poor.He also vowed to slow the rate of increase in fuel taxes if international oil prices rise too rapidly but only after a tax hike due in January.But many protesters were unconvinced by Macron's speech on Tuesday."For two weeks we've been trying to make ourselves heard but nothing has changed," said Gaetan Kerr, a 52-year-old farmer from the Yonne region, said near the Champs-Elysees on Saturday."At some point Macron is going to have to listen, otherwise this is going to get worse and worse."
"We Want Dignity": 75,000 Protest Against Emmanuel Macron in France
Police and anti-government protesters clashed near the Champs-Elysees and in other parts of central Paris Saturday with demonstrators hurling rocks and paint at riot police who responded with tear gas.The clashes came as thousands took part in a third weekend of "yellow vest" protests which have morphed from anger over fuel taxes into a broader anti-government movement.Crowds of protesters gathering at the Arc de Triomphe earlier found the Champs-Elysees locked down with police manning barricades and water cannon.While several dozen were allowed through after an ID check and search, many others -- some wearing gas masks or ski goggles -- remained behind and fought with police who fired rounds of tear gas.Spreading from the Champs-Elysees, protesters led police on cat-and-mouse chases through other parts of the capital, setting light to cars and construction equipment.Authorities said 160 people had been arrested by the afternoon and 65 people injured, including eleven of the 5,000 police officers mobilised for the protests.An estimated 75,000 demonstrators were counted across the country as of 3:00 pm (1400 GMT), the interior ministry said, which for the most part remained calm.The number was well below the first day of protests on November 17, which attracted around 282,000 people, and also down from the 106,000 who turned out last Saturday.Dark plumes of smoke in several parts of Paris, however, were testament to the escalation in violence, to the consternation of many of the "yellow vests", so-called for the high-visibility jackets they wear."We're a peaceful movement, but we're disorganised -- it's a mess because we don't have a leader," said Dan Lodi, a 68-year-old pensioner on the Champs-Elysees."You always have some idiots who come to fight, but they don't represent us at all," he said.Stores and restaurants along the Champs-Elysees as well as surrounding streets had boarded up windows, anticipating a repeat of the clashes last Saturday which President Emmanuel Macron compared to "war scenes".Chantal, a 61-year-old pensioner who came from an eastern Paris suburb, said she was avoiding the "hooligans" but was determined to send Macron a message on the rising costs of living."He has to come down off his pedestal," she said under cold rain on the Champs-Elysees. "Every month I have to dip into my savings."Others voiced indignation at graffiti sprayed on the Arc de Triomphe, a monument to French war dead, including phrases like "Macron resign" and "the yellow vests triumph".Although police managed to clear the square around the Arc de Triomphe toward midday, sporadic clashes spilled into nearby neighbourhoods, and hundreds of protesters later returned to the square.But further down on the Champs-Elysees, several hundred people marched calmly behind a huge yellow-and-red banner reading "Macron, stop taking us for idiots!""With all these tax hikes, there's not much left for eating at the end of the month," said Philippe, a high school cook in the Essonne region outside Paris.The "yellow vest" movement erupted on social media in October and has since become a wider protest against Macron, who is accused of failing to recognise the rising cost of living that has left many struggling.The countrywide protests have included many pensioners and have been most active in small urban and rural areas where demonstrators blocked roads, closed motorway toll booths, and even walled up the entrance to tax offices.Two people have died and dozens have been injured in the protests, which opinion polls suggest still attract the support of two out of three French people.Attempts by the government to negotiate with the grassroots movement have failed, in large part because representatives have insisted on public talks broadcast on TV."We want our dignity back and we want to be able to live from our work, which is absolutely not the case today," Jason Herbert said after walking out of talks with Prime Minister Edouard Philippe on Friday.Macron has sought to douse the anger by promising three months of nationwide talks on how best to transform France into a low-carbon economy without penalising the poor.He also vowed to slow the rate of increase in fuel taxes if international oil prices rise too rapidly but only after a tax hike due in January.But many protesters were unconvinced by Macron's speech on Tuesday."For two weeks we've been trying to make ourselves heard but nothing has changed," said Gaetan Kerr, a 52-year-old farmer from the Yonne region, said near the Champs-Elysees on Saturday."At some point Macron is going to have to listen, otherwise this is going to get worse and worse."
"We Want Dignity": 75,000 Protest Against Emmanuel Macron in France
Police and anti-government protesters clashed near the Champs-Elysees and in other parts of central Paris Saturday with demonstrators hurling rocks and paint at riot police who responded with tear gas.The clashes came as thousands took part in a third weekend of "yellow vest" protests which have morphed from anger over fuel taxes into a broader anti-government movement.Crowds of protesters gathering at the Arc de Triomphe earlier found the Champs-Elysees locked down with police manning barricades and water cannon.While several dozen were allowed through after an ID check and search, many others -- some wearing gas masks or ski goggles -- remained behind and fought with police who fired rounds of tear gas.Spreading from the Champs-Elysees, protesters led police on cat-and-mouse chases through other parts of the capital, setting light to cars and construction equipment.Authorities said 160 people had been arrested by the afternoon and 65 people injured, including eleven of the 5,000 police officers mobilised for the protests.An estimated 75,000 demonstrators were counted across the country as of 3:00 pm (1400 GMT), the interior ministry said, which for the most part remained calm.The number was well below the first day of protests on November 17, which attracted around 282,000 people, and also down from the 106,000 who turned out last Saturday.Dark plumes of smoke in several parts of Paris, however, were testament to the escalation in violence, to the consternation of many of the "yellow vests", so-called for the high-visibility jackets they wear."We're a peaceful movement, but we're disorganised -- it's a mess because we don't have a leader," said Dan Lodi, a 68-year-old pensioner on the Champs-Elysees."You always have some idiots who come to fight, but they don't represent us at all," he said.Stores and restaurants along the Champs-Elysees as well as surrounding streets had boarded up windows, anticipating a repeat of the clashes last Saturday which President Emmanuel Macron compared to "war scenes".Chantal, a 61-year-old pensioner who came from an eastern Paris suburb, said she was avoiding the "hooligans" but was determined to send Macron a message on the rising costs of living."He has to come down off his pedestal," she said under cold rain on the Champs-Elysees. "Every month I have to dip into my savings."Others voiced indignation at graffiti sprayed on the Arc de Triomphe, a monument to French war dead, including phrases like "Macron resign" and "the yellow vests triumph".Although police managed to clear the square around the Arc de Triomphe toward midday, sporadic clashes spilled into nearby neighbourhoods, and hundreds of protesters later returned to the square.But further down on the Champs-Elysees, several hundred people marched calmly behind a huge yellow-and-red banner reading "Macron, stop taking us for idiots!""With all these tax hikes, there's not much left for eating at the end of the month," said Philippe, a high school cook in the Essonne region outside Paris.The "yellow vest" movement erupted on social media in October and has since become a wider protest against Macron, who is accused of failing to recognise the rising cost of living that has left many struggling.The countrywide protests have included many pensioners and have been most active in small urban and rural areas where demonstrators blocked roads, closed motorway toll booths, and even walled up the entrance to tax offices.Two people have died and dozens have been injured in the protests, which opinion polls suggest still attract the support of two out of three French people.Attempts by the government to negotiate with the grassroots movement have failed, in large part because representatives have insisted on public talks broadcast on TV."We want our dignity back and we want to be able to live from our work, which is absolutely not the case today," Jason Herbert said after walking out of talks with Prime Minister Edouard Philippe on Friday.Macron has sought to douse the anger by promising three months of nationwide talks on how best to transform France into a low-carbon economy without penalising the poor.He also vowed to slow the rate of increase in fuel taxes if international oil prices rise too rapidly but only after a tax hike due in January.But many protesters were unconvinced by Macron's speech on Tuesday."For two weeks we've been trying to make ourselves heard but nothing has changed," said Gaetan Kerr, a 52-year-old farmer from the Yonne region, said near the Champs-Elysees on Saturday."At some point Macron is going to have to listen, otherwise this is going to get worse and worse."
Man Accused of Brutally Killing Utah Teens, Dumping Bodies in Mine Shaft
The three-month search for a missing teen couple ended at an abandoned mine shaft near Eureka, Utah, 100 feet below the ground where police found the bodies of 18-year-old Riley Powell and 17-year-old Brelynne "Breezy" Otteson.On Tuesday, prosecutors accused a 41-year-old man of putting them there.Jerrod William Baum is accused of brutally killing the teens and disposing their bodies in the mine shaft because they met up with his girlfriend. He has not been asked to file a plea yet and is awaiting appointment of a public defender to represent him.Sometime in the early morning hours of Dec. 30, according to the charges filed Tuesday, Baum came home to discover Powell and Otteson hanging out with Morgan Henderson. Baum, Henderson, 34, told police, was a jealous man: He had a strict rule prohibiting her from inviting male friends to the home, where they lived together.This, she told police, is why Baum bound the teens, placed them in the trunk of Powell's own Jeep Cherokee and drove them to the mine. He made Henderson come with him, according to the charges. Once there, Baum allegedly forced Otteson to watch as he beat Powell and stabbed him to death, before killing her too and dumping their bodies down the shaft.He is charged with two counts of aggravated murder, two counts of kidnapping, desecration of their bodies and obstruction of justice.Deputy Utah County Attorney Chad Grunander called the murders "heinous and depraved." "This is a potential capital case. Mr. Baum could die for what he allegedly did," Grunander said at a Tuesday news conference, adding the final decision about seeking the death penalty will be made at a later date.The two teenagers went missing the night of Dec. 29, 2017, never returning home to Powell's father's house, where both of them lived, the Salt Lake Tribune reported. The house is in Eureka, an old mining town of 682 people. They had been dating for four months.By Jan. 2, family members reported them missing to the police. A helicopter spotted Powell's Jeep Cherokee just over a week later, tucked in the mud among cedar trees near Cherry Creek Reservoir, its tires slashed and a tie-down strap dangling from its driver's side window. The couple was nowhere in sight."Because of the circumstances surrounding that discovery," Juab County Sheriff Douglas Anderson said at a March 29 news conference, "it became evident that we were dealing with foul play . . ..." Henderson and Baum first came under suspicion several days later. Police obtained a warrant to search Powell's Facebook account, and they soon found messages he had exchanged with Henderson on the night he and Otteson disappeared.According to court documents, Henderson invited the teenagers to come over to her and Baum's home sometime after midnight, in neighbouring Mammoth, Utah, a ghost town whose population dwindled with the close of the mines years ago.Over the course of three interviews with investigators, her story about what happened that night, in the early hours of Dec. 30, would change dramatically. First, she said she and the teen couple smoked marijuana for about 40 minutes, and then they left, and she never heard from them again. Two months later, she decided to reveal the rest of the story, ultimately leading police to the mine, according to court documents.According to the criminal complaint, she told police Baum "arrived home upset" that she was having the visitors.Outside, Baum allegedly "bound the victims' hands and feet, duct-taped their mouths, and placed them in the back of Riley's jeep," prosecutors wrote in the complaint.Baum then went back inside and told Henderson to come out, she told police. "Jerrod told her to get in the jeep and that they would go for a ride to have a talk," police wrote.They soon arrived at the abandoned Tintic Standard Mine No. 2, once a haven for precious metals mining in the early 20th century, until it closed in 1949. The mine shaft, now full of graffiti, is a 1,800-foot-deep concrete shaft, and Baum, Henderson said, brought the teenagers to its edge."Morgan described that Brelynne was forced to kneel near the open mine pit and witness the beating of her boyfriend, Riley Powell, and his stabbing, before she had her throat cut and was also thrown into the open mine," prosecutors wrote in the charging complaint. Baum had "made Riley suffer," but "felt bad about Brelynne, so he made her death quick and painless," Henderson said Baum told her after the killings.Henderson ultimately led police to the area near the mine and to the sludge barrel where Baum allegedly hid the teenagers' destroyed cellphones, the duct tape, several lengths of rope, two knife sheaths and a tie-down strap, just like the one found dangling on the window of Powell's Jeep. She then admitted to driving the Jeep off to a far, remote location in attempt to hide it, according to the probable cause statement.Henderson has been arrested on charges of obstruction of justice, but Grunander said prosecutors are reviewing possible additional charges. She has not filed a plea yet and no lawyer was known to be representing her.Baum is currently being held without bail. He appeared before a judge Tuesday to hear the charges lodged against him. A judge agreed to appoint a public defender to represent him. No attorney spoke on his behalf or could be reached for comment.Speaking to reporters the day after their loved ones were found, Powell's father, Bill Powell, and Otteson's aunt, Amanda Hunt, said that finding the teenagers was not enough to bring them closure. They questioned how someone could have killed them "over nothing," Bill Powell said."None of it makes sense," he said. "Here's two kids that had their whole life ahead of them, and it's gone." "These are just kids," Hunt added. "He's a 41-year-old man. And regardless - I guess the mentality is not there, but you don't kill kids for jealousy." On Tuesday, following Baum's first court appearance, Bill Powell and Hunt said they would support the death penalty for Baum. As the teenagers' family members gathered in the courtroom gallery, Baum entered shackled in a yellow jumpsuit to hear the charges read against him. Merely seeing him, the family said later, was emotionally draining."It's just hard to realize they're gone now," Powell's sister, Nikki Powell, told reporters."Really gone."
5 True Crime Short Stories of Mothers Who Killed Their Children
It's not something anyone wants to discuss. Mothers who kill their children are a depressing, horrifying thought. But it does happen and, sadly enough, will continue to occur as long as (wo)mankind exists.Sometimes a mother's urge to kill her child is the result of an untreated medical condition such as Postpartum Depression. Other times it is the result of an uncontrolled rage, whether at a child or children who have pushed their mother too far or a way to lash out at the father over real or perceived wrongs.Whatever the cause may be, it is heartbreaking nonetheless and not something easily forgotten.The following five cases are stories of mothers who murdered their own that I have never forgotten.Probably will never forget. And neither will you.1. Andrea Pia Kennedy Yates When someone thinks of mothers who murder their children, Andrea Yates is probably the first one who comes to mind.On June 20, 2001, a nation sat stunned as five lifeless little bodies were removed from a Houston, Texas, home.During a press conference held by law enforcement officials (who struggled to maintain composure) made the announcement that Noah, age 7; John, age 5; Paul, age 3; Luke, 2; and little Mary, only 5 months old, had been drowned in the family bathtub, one by one, by their mother.Although Postpartum depression was a recognized condition among medical personnel before 2001, the general public knew very little about it. As a matter of fact, the general consensus was it was a mild condition that typically disappeared within a short time following a baby's birth.But the public was awarded a quick education in the varying degrees of Postpartum Depression. Coupled with the fact that Andrea's husband, Rusty Yates, had known his wife was depressed and struggled with child-rearing duties but frequently left her alone contrary to a doctor's advice not to do so, the court of public opinion began to swing in Andrea's favor and put Rusty in the proverbial hot-seat.On July 26, 2006, Andrea was found not guilty by reason of insanity and committed to the North Texas State Hospital. In a statement made by her attorney in 2011, George Parnham says he expect his client will soon be released and begin rebuilding her life.2. Dianne Odell In May 2003, an Arizona man who purchased the unclaimed contents of delinquent storage unites got more than he bargained for. Among the boxes he now owned was three plastic-wrapped infant corpses.The investigative trail led police to Pennsylvania resident Diane Odell who later confessed that the three babies did indeed belonged her. However, she claimed that the children died a natural death. Later she would add a fourth child that investigators were unaware of to the mix, along with changing her story to claim her parents had forced her into teenage prostitution and her mother had killed the babies that she considered "bastard children." Diane told police she had carried the three babies in a suitcase that had been with her as she lived in various states until she left them in the Arizona storage facility. She was under the impression that they had been discarded (without discovery) by the owners in 1994 when she had become delinquent with her payments.3. Marybeth Roe Tinning It took 18 years and the death of eight children before someone finally pointed an accusing finger at Marybeth Tinning.In what is considered to be one of the worst cases of Münchausen Syndrome by proxy, Joe and Marybeth Tinning had eight natural children who all suffered mysterious ailments while in the care of Marybeth until admitted to the hospital where the symptoms would conspicuously disappear.Because the deaths occurred between 1967 and 1985, a time when medical science was still largely unfamiliar with cases of Munchhausen by proxy, doctors and nurses, although suspicious, were unwilling to outright proclaim that a mother had killed her child. Instead medical personnel made statements to the effect that the deaths may have been genetic disorder, especially considering there was no real evidence of wrongdoing.But genetics couldn't play a factor in the death of the couple's adopted son Michael. He was the couple's fifth child and an obvious contradiction to medical theories. However, it would be the ninth child, Tami Lynne Tinning, on August 22, 1985, that finally caught the attention of police.During an interrogation, Marybeth confessed to smothering Tami Lynne and two other of her children, although she later retracted her statement and said she had only smothered two. She was later convicted for the murder of Tami Lynne and sentenced to a 20 year prison term.On January 10, 2013, Marybeth was denied parole for the fourth time since becoming eligible for release in 2007.4. Diana L. Lumbrera Her modus operandi never wavered. Diana Lumbrera would have a baby and somewhere between within the first couple of years, the child would be rush to the emergency room with complaints of seizures and lethargy. Some of the six children would be dead on arrival. Although doctors could find no medical reasons for the deaths, they did not suspect foul play.Even the children of relatives were not safe from this murderous woman. On October 8, 1980, Diana took her cousin's six-week-old infant Erika Aleman for a drive but within 30 minutes they were at the emergency room with Diana telling her now familiar tale of a child suffering lethal convulsions.Diane would have one more child to die in Texas but she pulled up stakes and relocated to Garden City, Kansas. It would prove to be her undoing.Knocked up once again, undoubtedly by a boyfriend unfamiliar with her past, Diana gave birth to a son she named Jose Antonio on February 21, 1986. It's unexplainable why Diana allowed this child to live for four years and three months before she went rushing to the emergency room on May 1, 1990, with complaints once again of a child suffering convulsions.Where Diana had made her mistake, however, was she had taken the child to visit his pediatrician just the day before. Not finding anything wrong with the child, the pediatrician prescribed antibiotics as a precaution and sent him home with his other. Diana never filled his prescription.Unlike the Texas emergency rooms who never seemed to suspect murder, the Garden City doctors immediately contact authorities and an investigation ensued.During the investigation, police learned of the deaths of the children in Texas and also gathered evidence of Diana frequently used tales of a child with Leukemia and the death of her father in a nonexistent car accident in order to gain the sympathy of creditors. Additionally, they discovered a $5,000 life insurance policy on little Jose.Before long, Diana found herself indicted on multiple counts of murder. Following a trial, jurors took less than an hour to find her guilty and she was subsequently sentenced to life imprisonment, with a minimum of fifteen years before she would be eligible for parole.A few weeks later, Texas Rangers flew Diana back to Palmer County, Texas, where she faced three counts of murder, with a possible death sentence under a new serial-murder statute. In an ironic twist of self-preservation, Diana Lumbrera pled guilty to daughter Melissa's murder to avoid being executed. The additional charges two charges of murder were dropped in the plea agreement. She was returned to Kansas to begin serving her time.Diana was paroled from Kansas on June 30, 2005, and sent directly to Texas. She is currently housed at the infamous Mountain View women's prison in Gatesville, Texas. She will first be eligible for parole in February 2013.5. Marie Noe By now you're no doubt astounded that Mothers can kill so many of the children and get away with it for so long. Indeed it is incredible. If you'll notice, however, with the exception of Andrea Yates, all of these murders occurred over a span of time and prior to the year 2000.Marie Noe is another mother who killed multiple children before Munchhausen Syndrome by proxy became a household word.Between 1949 and 1968, Marie would give birth to ten children. All ten of those child would die at birth or shortly thereafter; eight of them at the hands of their mother. Autopsies would reveal no evidence of murder.During the Cesarean delivery of the tenth child, Marie suffered uterine repture and had to undergo a hysterectomy; saving an untold number of babies from certain death.Life carried as normal in Philadelphia for Marie and Arthur Noe until Philadelphia Magazine reporter Stephen Fried read about Marie in a book titled The Death of Innocents , which stated that multiple cases of SIDS in a family should be investigated.Fried interviewed Marie who stated "We just weren't meant to be parents," while her husband followed with, "The Lord needed angels." Fried also interviewed medical examiners, health care workers who had attended to the Noe children, and other parties versed in similar cases and when he was ready to write his article, he turned his findings over to police.After Marie was brought in for questioning, she finally confessed to the death of four of the infants. On August 5, 1998, she was charged with eight counts of murder.While the headlines of a mother being charged with the deaths of her babies 30 to 49 years after the fact were quite titillating. But the shocker came after she plead guilty on June 28, 1999, and was sentenced to only 20 years probation. Citizens were outraged as prosecutors tried to explain that Marie was 70 years old and no longer able to bear children.It did little to assuage their outcries.As of this writing, Marie continues to live in the Philadelphia home where her children died. Arthur Noe died in 2009.
Buttocks-grabber Assaults Two Women in Separate Incidents in Nanaimo
Nanaimo RCMP are looking for witnesses after two women reported having their buttocks grabbed by a man just 10 minutes apart as they walked on Bowen Road. Similarities in the descriptions given by the women led police to believe the two incidents involved the same man. The alleged sexual assaults occurred around 11:30 a.m. on May 27. Const. Gary O'Brien of Nanaimo RCMP said this type of unwanted sexual touching is not uncommon and many incidents of the same nature likely go unreported. "When there's one offence, there's often multiple offences," O'Brien said. "He's acting out some kind of deviance." The first incident involved a 21-year-old woman who was crossing the road at Bowen Road and Dufferin Crescent. The suspect walked up to the woman, grabbed her buttocks, then ran northbound on Bowen Road. The woman was "shocked" and yelled out, O'Brien said. She told police there were many cars and some pedestrians in the intersection who might have witnessed the incident or seen the man running away. The second incident occurred 10 minutes later near a gas station close to the intersection of Meredith and Bowen roads. The suspect walked up to a 32-year-old mother pushing her baby in a stroller, grabbed her buttocks and took off, again running northbound on Bowen Road. The two women gave similar descriptions, saying the male suspect appeared to be possibly Spanish or Indigenous with short hair and was carrying a black backpack. The first woman said he was wearing brown pants and a light-coloured shirt. The second woman described his outfit as tan khaki pants and a white T-shirt. "Hopefully by putting this out, this may assist other women, if there are other victims out there," O'Brien said. The RCMP ask anyone with information about either incident to call 250-754-2345. Those wishing to remain anonymous can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or online at nanaimocrimestoppers.com. regan
pas de données

Copyright © 2020  Shandong Abusair Agricultural Machinery Co,. Ltd- |  Sitemap

Multifunctional farm Abusair machinery  |  Tea Professional Cultivator farm machinery