Strange Electrical Noise From Stepper Motor

What you are hearing is the effect of actually stepping the current. A sharp change in current produces a sharp change in the forces acting on the motor structure, which produces a certain amount of acoustical output. It's not quite the same as hitting it with a hammer (it's a step, not a pulse) but the idea is the same. If you listen closely, you will realize that the pitch of the sound you hear is determined by the stepping rate of your driver. If you vary the step rate, the pitch will change as well. The effect is not "pure", since the excitation (a step) produces lots of harmonics. If you replace your steppers with a pair of sine wave drivers, 90 degrees out of phase, you can get rotation which is essentially silent

1. Stepper Motor Not Responding. Wiring Issue?

Nope. Not wiring issue. Double check if you got the exact same chip in the tutorial. If so, it's probably a software problem. Try running the program as root

2. Smallest stepper motor (that one could buy)

You could take a look at The world's smallest stepper motor at elabz. They can be found inside BluRay drives, so might be a little on the expensive side if you want a bunch of them.Also, do not forget that if you want to reduce the power consumption of your stepper motor, you have a couple of options.

3. Simple Stepper motor for my experiment?

I would recommend tweaking your choice of independent variable slightly. I would consider each coil to be either ON, OFF, or ON(Reversed). I would then consider which coils are energized to be the independent variable.I think this is a great experiment. You should be able to build a working model similar to the diagram you posted. You can use toggle switches to control the coils and "step" the motor.A DPDT toggle switch can be hooked up so that middle is off, up is current in one direction, and down is current in the opposite direction. See here.

4. One stepper motor of two getting really hot

The L293D is only a driver that switches the supplied voltage to the load (motor). It has no current control, like chopper,... So basically when the motor is at standstill the current is limited only by its winding resistance. If it is spinning then the current is lower, since the back EMF voltage builds up: $$V_supp = Icdot RV_BEMF $$ $$I=dfracV_supp-V_BEMFR$$ $$V_BEMF=k_ecdot N_RPM$$ therefore at N=0:$$I=dfracV_suppR$$

5. RPi restarts when driving 28BYJ-48 (ULN2003) stepper motor through LM2577 Step-up converter module

You should not be running the power for a stepper motor (or any other moderately hi or pulsed load) through the pi, period. At the least give the load its own wiring directly back to the supply.While it is true that higher voltage supplies can yield much better stepper motor performance, a boost converter is going to be a poor way to do this. If you want to run your motor at 12v (say with a chopping driver) you should use a 12v supply, not one upconverted from a lower voltage where higher current would be required.If you have a good supply in the 12v range you could consider using a buck regulator to also power your pi from it, but you may find it simpler to use independent supplies for the pi and motors driver

6. Difference between stepper motor and servo motor - Thunder Laser

Do you know the difference between stepper motor and servo motor? Now thunder laser will show you the difference by using our Lite model laser cutter (stepper motors) and our Plus model laser cutter (servo motors). Seeing is believing, you can compare the difference from the video directly.

7. Debugging my Stepper Motor Driver circuit

I had this same issue when setting up this circuit with this code and driver on an Arduino Uno. All else was fine, but the current for the motor was set WAY too high on the driver from the factory. The VREF was 1.7 volts, and it needed to be around .5 for the motor I was using. As I set the VREF to the appropriate voltage, the motor started to spin as it should and stopped hissing. I know this post is old, but I hope that this helps someone else. Pololu has a great video (and documentation in general) for setting the appropriate voltage on most of their drivers on the product page here: DRV8825 Stepper Motor Driver Carrier, High Current

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Problem with Stepper Motor Not Landing on Same Spot
In addition to Zebonaut's post, we have also seen more esoteric behaviour driving steppers:1. Will the Stepper Motor 17HS3401 work fine with the TMC2130 driver? Or is the driver chip going to burn? Are they compatible?Higher operating voltages translate to higher stepping rates (and higher peak RPM, higher torque at higher RPMs). If you operate the motor from 3.12V, you will get the rated torque at 0 RPM (aka holding force), but performance at any speed will be poor. Since the TMC2130 driver is a constant current PWM driver, higher voltages (up to the rated voltage of the TMS2130 and any filter caps/etc) will produce better motor performance. The TMS2130 chip may get hotter (due to the internal LDO to drive internal circuitry).For most applications you will be fine with 12V.Additional simplified explanation: The higher voltages are needed to quickly change the current flow in the motor coils.2. Which stepper motor should be enough to move a water valve and for the TMC2130 driver?This is not how you make a simple hydraulic linear fluid valve, but one that is precision controlled to your specs.In order to make it linear, you need to know the torque transfer function might not be position-dependent with ageing on the valve or water pressure. But you do need to control torque with a motor. The best way is to use current to control the motor torque limit, but you need to define position, velocity and acceleration as ther emay be some backlash. You can attempt to measure it and then do the same for your stepper motors vs voltage or current limit then define a,v,x transfer functions. To allow cogging with low torque limit, recal is needed to home position. Full Steps can be used.3. What is "idle current reduction" used for on a CNC stepper motor driver?They will reduce the power to the steppers after they have been idled for a set period of time.. This will decrease heat and increase the life of the system. Depending on what you are doing you would not use this feature. If you plan on leaving your machine on long periods of time it would be good option. Most hobbyist turn their machines off when they are done running. It would be better going with gecko controller if you have the money.4. Conserving battery life in a stepper motor circuitYou may be a little confused.The intent of connecting the enables to the micro is so you can turn off the motors when you are not repositioning. That is, the motors should hold position by means of the detent torque of the motors themselves and consume no power while stationary.That of course assumes the motors will hold position when unpowered. The mechanism should be balanced appropriately to allow for that.In order to do that you would really need independent control over both motors. The up down motor only needing to be powered briefly at the end of each horizontal scan. As such, you would need two IO pins for enables and four pins for the winding control pins. (Though since you are only running one motor at a time, you can get away with two pins for this.)simulate this circuit - Schematic created using CircuitLabHOWEVER: A bigger issues you will face is the 293 is not suitable for running things at 5V. The device can not drive close enough to the rails to provide your required drive voltage. See this cross-post5. How to run stepper motor at its maximum speedThe speed of the stepper motor (assuming you measure it in RPM) will depend on many factors. I am not sure how the "30 step size at 7V" you mention is relevant.IMHO, the most important parameters are1) physical parameters of motor (steps per revolution, rated voltage, motor intetia)2) Load on the motor3) software implementationNormally you should not be able to affect 1( if you are looking like most arduino's developers you should be looking at things like this. i.e. 200 steps per revolution, 5-12VDC and a few tens to hundreds of g*cm^2 or motor inertia.) or 2 (although with higher loads lower velocities can be achieved, normally you select the motor based on the load and not vice versa).Therefore you are left with Software implementation. Things here can get messy very quickly depending on how experienced you are and what you want to do. e.g. The arduino Stepper library is simple and you can set parameters but it is blocking (i.e. you can not do anything else until movement is completed, or interrupts are used). If you want to get your hands dirty (and your head messed up ;-/ ) you can looks at My experience is that normally you can get up to 150 [rpm] easily. Theoretically you should be able to go higher but the uC should be doing pretty much nothing else.
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